It’s all about that medal count … right? 

T-minus one day until the opening ceremony and omg omg omg. Excuse us while we get overcome by the Olympic spirit and squee about all that custom Ralph Lauren on Team USA. So, OK, an important question … will we (America) beat (or rule) the rest of the world? By the time the Rio Games wrap up later this month, barring a major upset, the U.S. will likely say so. For Americans, the overall medal count is huge. It *shows* we win, right? Well, the rest of the world says not so fast. In other countries, the table is ordered based on the number of GOLD medals, with the allocation for silver and bronze as a tiebreaker. America counts them all. Harumph. Well, Olympians of all stripes, may the odds be ever in your favor. Here’s how to watch the Summer Games.

Trump. Clinton. That post-convention ‘bounce’ sure doesn’t mean what it used to

Every political convention promises it, every presidential nominee wants it, everybody talks about it. But “the bounce”  — the spike in polls a convention usually gives a candidate — ain’t what it used to be, ain’t enough to win, ain’t even a sign of who will win, writes USA TODAY’s Rick Hampson. And this year other, ahem, political news has certainly been a factor. Worth noting: In the last 11 elections, when the dust after the conventions has settled, the candidate leading in the polls won the popular vote. With that:

Bizarre knife attack in London leaves American woman dead

From what we know now, it was likely a mental health-related episode rather than terrorism that led a man to attack people with a knife in London’s Russell Square, near the British Museum. Darlene Horton, the wife of a Florida State University professor, was in London as part of a study abroad program. The students had already returned home.

Biden has the best surprise for Obama’s birthday

Can we just talk about the friendship bracelet Vice President Biden made for President Obama’s 55th birthday? If this doesn’t say best friends (and leaders of the free world) forever, what does? This B-Day is the last one Obama spends in the White House. In light of the occasion, we decided to look back on 10 times the president fused politics with pop culture.

Dylann Roof was attacked by a fellow inmate  

The 22-year-old man who faces multiple murder charges in the killing of nine black parishioners at a Charleston, S.C, church last year, was attacked near the shower in jail.  Dylann Roof wasn’t seriously injured, but he does have bruises on his face and back. Before the June 17, 2015, attack at Emanuel AME church, Roof posted on social media that he hoped the killings would provoke a race war. Roof is white. The inmate who attacked him is black. Roof and his attorney are not planning to file charges.

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Dylann Roof, who faces murder charges in the killing of nine black parishioners at a Charleston, S.C, church, was attacked in the shower by a fellow inmate at the detention center where he has been held for over a year, according to media reports.

How USA Gymnastics protected coaches over kids

Complaints about coaches sexually abusing child gymnasts … filed away in a drawer. Unreported. Top executives at USA Gymnastics, the national governing body behind the Olympic team, have failed to report to police many allegations of sexual misconduct by coaches, an investigation by The Indianapolis Star — part of the USA TODAY Network — has found. That allowed predatory coaches to continue working with children — with USA Gymnastics’ stamp of approval — for years after the organization was warned. The Indianapolis Star uncovered multiple examples of children suffering abuse long after USA Gymnastics had received warnings. The newspaper is also seeking access to the sealed files on more than 50 coaches. More about the findings:

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USA Gymnastics has failed to report to police many allegations of sexual misconduct by coaches. That allowed predatory coaches to continue working with children for years after the organization was warned.
Robert Scheer/IndyStar

This is a compilation of stories across USA TODAY.