NASCAR chairman and CEO Brian France indicated a harsh penalty could be in store for Matt Kenseth when officials release their decision later Tuesday.

France, appearing on Sirius/XM Radio, said Kenseth went too far in intentionally wrecking Joey Logano at Martinsville Speedway as payback for an incident at Kansas Speedway last month.

The crash prevented Logano, who was leading Sunday’s race, from winning the event and clinching a spot in the Nov. 22 championship race at Homestead-Miami Speedway.

“We don’t want that to happen again,” France said. “We don’t want any of our events to be altered in a way they shouldn’t be.

“What we want to prevent happening is drivers or any participant in NASCAR to take matters into their own hands and begin to control the outcome of races beyond hard racing. When that happens, that’s a very serious thing for us. And we’ll be dealing with that.”

Asked specifically about a possible suspension for Kenseth, France said all options were on the table and indicated some penalty could also be issued to Danica Patrick after she intentionally crashed into David Gilliland.

But the Kenseth wreck was particularly egregious given its effect on both Logano’s race and title hopes. France said Martinsville was much different than the racing incident between Logano and Kenseth at Kansas, which he had termed “quintessential NASCAR.”

VIDEO: Brian France on Matt Kenseth’s move

“That was an entirely different situation,” he said. “What we’re not going to do is take the style of NASCAR and parlay that into something where one driver believes the way to pay back somebody for something that happened is take matters into their own hands. Obviously, we won’t be accepting that.

“The way to pay drivers back is to race them hard. That’s NASCAR. But what happened on Sunday is not quite the way we’d like things to turn out.”

France said he sympathized with Kenseth for being in a disappointing situation after getting “the short end of the stick” in the Kansas incident, but that still didn’t excuse his actions at Martinsville. NASCAR racing has always had some contact, France said, but there’s a “bright line” between what’s acceptable and going too far.

“There are always limits, right?” France said when asked about NASCAR’s “Boys have at it” policy. “… When those limits are exceeded, you can expect we’ll deal with that.

“The drivers know those limits. They know. They understand what’s hard racing, taking chances, a little bit of contact – and they realize when they do something that’s way over the line. They may not say it, but they understand it – and we certainly do.”

Follow Gluck on Twitter @jeff_gluck

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